Email reported Nov. 17

CSUPD and IT officials are investigating an incident of a racist email sent to a small group of faculty that referenced an individual student. The email was sent from a spoof address. CSU strongly condemns this behavior and has moved quickly to investigate and prevent further abuses. Anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact CSUPD at (970) 491-6425. For additional information on CSU public safety incidents and support resources, visit https://safety.colostate.edu/.

Email from the CSU Public Safety Team

Graffiti reported Oct. 29

Racist graffiti and a mannequin head with Nazi symbols were found in a dumpster enclosure near Moby Arena on campus October 28. It was in an area not visible to the public and did not appear to target any individuals.

The symbols and sentiments expressed are deeply offensive and do not reflect the values and character of this university. CSUPD is investigating the vandalism and any updates to the investigation will be posted to the public safety site. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact CSUPD at (970) 491-6425.

This message is intended to make the campus community aware of this incident and to reiterate that Colorado State sets high expectations for respect and behavior, as articulated in our Principles of Community. Incidents of racism, anti-Semitism, and discriminatory prejudice designed to intimidate that are reported to the university and under investigation will be posted on the CSU Public Safety site, along with their resolution when it becomes available.

If you or someone you know is impacted by this incident and needs support, please utilize these resources:

If you are concerned about someone in the campus community, you can use the Tell Someone website or call (970) 491-1350 to make an anonymous referral and professionals on campus will follow up to offer resources.

(Email from the Public Safety Team)

Durward Hall Incident reported Oct. 12

Yesterday afternoon, a photo of a student with a Nazi swastika painted on her arm in one of our residence halls was posted on Snapchat. The photo is no longer visible online but it has caused significant concern on campus, and the University is working with students in the halls and in our Jewish student organizations to follow up and provide support.

The students involved have been identified and we are following University protocol to pursue appropriate follow-up and next steps under our Student Code of Conduct. This message is intended to make the campus community aware of this incident and to reiterate that Colorado State sets high expectations for respect and behavior, as articulated in our Principles of Community. There is no place for bias and hate in the CSU community, and such incidents are never…repeat, never… funny. As Halloween approaches, this is a good time to remind all of us that offensive practical jokes and costumes that appropriate the race, culture, religion, and nationality of other people are also not welcome at CSU.

Going forward, incidents of bias that are reported to the university and under investigation will be posted on the CSU Public Safety site, along with their resolution when it becomes available.

If you or someone you know is impacted by this incident and needs support, please utilize these resources:

If you are concerned about someone in the campus community, you can use the Tell Someone website or call (970) 491-1350 to make an anonymous referral and professionals on campus will follow up to offer resources.

From the Public Safety Team

(Email to campus from the Public Safety Team)

Update Oct. 13: After this community message was sent, two additional instances of swastikas etched and drawn on two community posters on a floor in Allison Hall were reported to Residence Life staff who notified CSUPD. Residence Life staff have removed the posters and are hosting a floor meeting for the impacted floor on Sunday. Education and outreach will continue in Allison Hall.

 

Incident on Transfort bus reported Oct.5

Dear Colleagues,

We have been hearing from students and faculty since the beginning of this semester that we, as a university, need to do a better job of communicating around bias or hate incidents that occur on our campus that negatively target an individual or a community. Such incidents, even when legally protected by the First Amendment, can fly in the face of our campus Principles of Community and leave members of our CSU family feeling isolated and intimidated. While we always intervene with those immediately impacted, it can be a difficult decision as to when to share information with the entire campus community, and I’ll admit it’s a decision we haven’t always gotten right. We have had several reported incidents of hate already this semester. It began with the paper noose that was hung in one of our residence halls just before classes started. And yesterday, our Jewish students, along with faculty, staff, and allies, marched in solidarity to draw attention to two anti-Semitic messages that appeared recently in the halls – one left anonymously on a student’s whiteboard and another involving an anti-Semitic nickname given to someone’s personal server that was visible to many on our campus network.

We have heard these concerns about communication and take them seriously. I discussed this earlier this week with members of the President’s Cabinet and how we can do better. As a start, let’s reset some foundational elements: Colorado State University deplores any acts of hate and terror and takes seriously our responsibility to investigate them and address them appropriately through our judicial and conduct systems. And while allowing hateful speech to occur as required by law, we can still publicly and strenuously disdain it when there is evident harm to our institution and its people. How much to communicate and when – and through which vehicles — can be a difficult balancing act, weighing the potential of magnifying the voice of those who would seek to intimidate against failing to state how strongly we condemn such actions and risking the appearance of inaction or apathy. It’s a balancing act that can leave many of us feeling frustrated, hurt, and angry. But to manage that balancing act with vigilance and care is precisely our responsibility as members of an academic community.

To that end, one of our Middle Eastern students had a concerning experience yesterday while riding on a local bus, and there are several points about this incident that are worth addressing. The woman was riding the bus when a local resident (one known to law enforcement and not a member of the CSU community) began to exhibit disturbing and intimidating behavior toward her. Such behavior is indefensible and utterly offensive to our community, which cherishes internationalism and diversity and is committed to inclusion and the safety of all people.

The incident also provided an outstanding demonstration of the power of effective bystander intervention. Other women and men on the bus interceded on our student’s behalf and condemned the man’s behavior, inserting themselves between our student and the perpetrator. A group of fellow passengers disembarked with her and walked her safely to her destination. The student did the right thing, as well, in reaching out to a trusted faculty member, who encouraged the student to report the incident to law enforcement. As a result, CSUPD was able to identify and cite the offender, who has been issued an exclusionary order from campus, which means he cannot be on CSU property.

This doesn’t erase the fear this woman felt or the feelings she will continue to struggle with over this incident. It doesn’t prevent such an incident from happening again, but it provides a model for all of us in upholding and defending our community standards. If you see something wrong, say something. If you are concerned about someone else or need personal guidance and support, Tell Someone. Take care of one another, because Rams take care of Rams – and because it’s our job as human beings.

In that spirit, I want to wish you all a renewing weekend filled with peace and community – get some rest, get out in the sun when you can, and know that our university is fully committed to your success and well-being. Be well.

-tony

Dr. Tony Frank

President

(email to campus from President Tony Frank, sent Oct. 6)

 

Bulletin board incident reported Sept. 22

Laurel Village Residents,

We are sad to share that a hateful incident has been reported in Alpine Hall. An anti-Semitic message was written on the dry-erase board on the door of one of our Jewish residents. As we are again faced with unacceptable behavior in our residence hall community that does not represent our CSU Principles of Community, please join us in creating a community where we make clear this type of behavior does not align with our values of inclusion, civility, and respect. These hateful actions must stop and it will take all of us acting together to help our community grow and be welcoming to all. This is a big task that won’t happen overnight but here are some things we can do to get started:

  • Pick up a “No Place 4 H8” poster and/or cling at the front desk and display it on your door, window, or in your room to show that you will not tolerate hate in your space.
  • Talk with your roommate(s), floormates, classmates, friends, and hall staff about what community means to you and engage in respectful conversations across differences to find common ground and increase knowledge.
  • Attend sessions at the Diversity Symposium next week to expand your understanding and discover new tools and techniques to support diversity and inclusion – http://diversity.colostate.edu/diversity-symposium/.
  • Report any targeted or hateful messages or actions in your community to Residence Life staff.
  • If you know anything about this incident, please call CSUPD at (970) 491-6425 to report or speak to your hall staff.

As mid-terms approach we know we are entering a stressful time of the semester and it is more important now than ever to make sure you have the resources you need and for all of us to support one another. If you or someone you know is impacted by this incident and needs support, please utilize these resources:

If you are concerned about someone in the campus community, you can use the Tell Someone website or call (970) 491-1350 to make an anonymous referral and professionals on campus will follow up to offer resources.

If you have any questions or concerns please respond to this email or contact us individually. We are here to support this community in any way we can.

In solidarity,
Jen Dawrs, Laurel Village Residence Director
Laura Giles, Director of Residence Life

(email sent to Laurel Village Residents Sept. 22)

 

Technology incident reported Sept. 12

Corbett, Laurel Village, Durward and Westfall Residents,

A resident has notified us that a device appearing on their phone under the Apple Airplay list had been changed from the default to an anti-Semitic and hateful name, and was appearing on the list of all available Apple TVs on the local network. We take this incident seriously and want to be very clear that this type of hateful behavior is unacceptable in our community.  As the response develops, we wanted to share the steps that have been taken so far and what we have planned next.

  • The device has been reported to CSUPD
  • Housing & Dining Services Technology is investigating to determine if the location and owner of the device can be identified
  • The Vice President for Diversity, the Vice President for Student Affairs, and Housing & Dining Services administrators have been notified and are actively involved in response and follow-up steps
  • We Are CSU and No Place for Hate messaging and posters are currently displayed in the residence hall to reinforce our community values
  • Residents are encouraged to speak with your Residence Director, Assistant Residence Director, Resident Assistants, and/or Inclusive Community Assistants at any time with questions or concerns
  • If you notice any targeted or hateful messages or actions in your community, please report to Residence Life staff

Please know that we will continue to respond to this incident in any way that we can. We recognize the cumulative effect of incidents like this on our campus and across the nation. As a university, we uphold and stand by our Principles of Community (inclusion, integrity, respect, service, and social justice) to ensure we build and maintain welcoming and inclusive communities for all of our residents.

If you, your roommate, or anyone around you has been impacted by this incident and needs support, please know that all of the resources below are available for you:

If you know anything about this incident, you can call the CSUPD non-emergency number at (970) 491-6425 to report or you can speak with Residence Life staff. If you are concerned about someone in the campus community, you can use the Tell Someone website or call (970) 491-1350 to make an anonymous referral and professionals on campus will follow up to offer resources.

If you have any questions or concerns please don’t hesitate to respond to this email or contact us individually. We are here to support this community in any way we can.

In solidarity,
Laura Giles, Director of Residence Life

(email sent to Corbett, Laurel Village, Durward and Westfall student residents on Sept. 12)

Newsom Hall incident reported Aug 19

Residence Hall Students,

As some of you may be hearing, there was a noose constructed of crepe paper found in Newsom Hall on Saturday afternoon. Our initial priority was making sure that the Newsom community received the outreach and support they needed. As part of our ongoing efforts to denounce this act, enforce that acts of hate and intimidation have no place at CSU, and emphasize the Principles of Community among our entire residential community, I wanted to share with you the message that Newsom Hall students received on Saturday evening (below) as well as the response steps that have been taken to date:

  • Residence Life called CSUPD when the noose was reported Saturday afternoon and there is an ongoing investigation.
  • The Newsom Residence Director, Residence Life Assistant Director, Residence Life Director, Interim Executive Director of Housing & Dining, and the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs were at Newsom Hall throughout Saturday evening to provide support for impacted students and staff.
  • An email message (below) was sent to all Newsom residents Saturday evening denouncing the act, sharing resources, and calling for an all-hall meeting Sunday evening (the CSU Public Safety Team, President’s Office, and many other campus partners were involved in drafting the email).
  • Copies of the email message were shared with all professional and graduate Residence Life staff, Housing & Dining Services directors, and the incident was shared with the Vice President of Student Affairs Council.
  • President Frank, Vice President of Student Affairs Blanche Hughes, and the Newsom Residence Director Andre Roberts facilitated an all-hall meeting Sunday evening to denounce the act and provide support for impacted students from the highest levels of CSU leadership. The CSU Health Network Counseling Services, Case Management, and the Director of the Black/African American Cultural Center were also at the hall meeting to provide support services.
  • The Housing & Dining Services Associate Director for Diversity, Inclusion, and Assessment is working with the Housing & Dining Communications office on a follow-up “We are CSU” printed communication for all halls to emphasize the Principles of Community and messages shared at the We are CSU event during Ram Welcome.

If you are concerned about or impacted by this incident, I encourage you to utilize the resources highlighted in the message below and I ask all of you to respect and support one another during this difficult time.

In solidarity,
Laura Giles, Director of Residence Life
Housing & Dining Services

(email to all students who live in a residence hall)